Pilot son takes dad on first official flight after following in his footsteps

Pilot son takes dad on first official flight after following in his footsteps

- Nick Brown became a pilot after following in the footsteps of his father, Wills Brown

- Nick's father was one of the very few successful Black pilots in the US in the 1960s

- The young pilot took his dad on his first official trip to show gratitude for his positive influence

At age six, Nick Brown knew he wanted to be just like his dad after seeing his father, Willis Brown, 84, fly planes and learning about how he blazed trails as one of few Black commercial pilots while growing up.

31 years later, Nick’s dream came true when he earned his private pilot’s license and took his father on a flight as his first passenger. It's an achievement he has worked towards since 2013.

“Usually it only takes about six months to a year and a half, but I work on an oil rig so it took me six years because I could only pursue the license on my days off,” Nick disclosed in an interview.

Their first flight together was a total of an hour and forty minutes from Wisener airport in Texas to Galveston Island and back.

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‘He bought me a chocolate cake. He was excited and he was really impressed with my flight plan.’’

Nick graduated with his degree in Electric Engineering Technology from Prairie View A&M University.

While he has a thriving career, becoming a pilot is something he always wanted to do.

Perhaps he was influenced by the experiences he and his two sisters gained flying with their father, who after 27 years, retired from American Airlines as an International Captain for the DC-10.

‘‘He would have these layovers for a few days and he would take us to whatever theme parks were in those cities,” he said.

“We were flying business class and first class as kids. He would fly us to Miami then he would fly us to LA and take us to Disneyland.”

He would have these layovers for a few days and he would take us to whatever theme parks were in those cities,” he said.

“We were flying business class and first class as kids. He would fly us to Miami then he would fly us to LA and take us to Disneyland.”

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Nick says that being able to take his Dad in the air was one of his proudest moments. While he plans to pursue his commercial license as a plan B, sharing the unique experience with his father has fulfilled him.

“If something were to happen and I were never able to fly again I would be okay since I was able to take my Dad up at least once,” he remarked.

Meanwhile, a self-taught Ghanaian coder has been named Africa Code Week Youth Ambassador for 2019 after he developed an Artificial Intelligence (AI) model for diagnosing breast cancer to help solve some of the continent’s biggest challenges.

Inspired by the Global Technology success stories, Mustapha Diyaol Haqq, a 19-year-old from Kumasi, Ghana, realized he too could deliver innovation where it was most needed, starting with his hometown.

READ ALSO: Genius Ghanaians turn plastic waste into fuels to power cars and for household use

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READ ALSO: Tech-savvy Ghanaian inventor develops AI for diagnosing breast cancer

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Source: Yen.com.gh

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