Woman becomes assistant head in school she once worked as a cleaner

Woman becomes assistant head in school she once worked as a cleaner

- Pam Talbert, assistant principal of Istrouma Middle has inspired many after she shared her story

- She disclosed in a gathering of teachers and staff that she started as a cleaner in the school

- Pam reveals that her children had to teach her when they returned from school to help her learn how to read and write

- She currently holds a bachelor's and master's degrees at Southern University

- Pam has returned to school to get her PhD and she shares her story of how her journey began

A woman has become an exceptional example after she stunned many with her story of how she moved from being a janitor to an assistant principal in a school she once mopped.

As teachers and staff at her school, Istrouma Middle, prepare for school to start after vacation, assistant principal Pam Talbert could not be more excited.

Pam's journey to being assistant head of the school was not easy and she reveals that she ‘‘started off as a janitor."

For someone who couldn’t read or write, becoming an education and even better, the assistant principal in school she worked as cleaner is pretty much of a miracle for her.

"Miracles happen and you're looking at a miracle. I am a miracle,’’ adding that "I could not read and write. I was on a third-grade level."

However, Pam only figured out a way to achieve her dreams after she had children.

She had to learn everything her children studied and they often sat her down when they returned from school to teach her.

READ ALSO: Ghanaian IT graduate becomes successful celebrity stylist after branching into tailoring

Woman becomes assistant headmistress in school she once worked as a cleaner

Pam Talbert. Photo credit: www.goodmorningamerica.com
Source: UGC

Eventually, after becoming a bus driver, she managed to go back to school and earn both her bachelor's and master's degrees at Southern University.

Pam reveals that she started that journey not being able to read and write.

‘‘It was very hard, but I persevered because I knew that it was important that I did that.’’

Pam's zeal for inspiring doesn't go unnoticed and when there are subjects that can't show up when teachers are absent, she goes in and teaches the class.

She shared her unique story to other parents to encourage other struggling children who may have similar stories.

"Despite where you're coming from, or your background, your history or where you live... It's going to be alright if you persevere. If you try," Talbert said. "First you have to put forth the steps. No one is going to give you anything."

Even more inspiring, Pam and her son are headed to school to earn their PhD's from Southern University.

Pam’s life-long goal is to establish a school for kids and parents to learn to read and write.

Meanwhile, some 250 African-Americans gathered at the Cape Coast Castle, Ghana, to mark the 400th anniversary of the arrival of the first ship of enslaved Africans to English North America in 1619.

While this was ongoing, tens and thousands of African-Americans had assembled at the Chesapeake Bay in Hampton, Virginia, to also mark the same activity.

Here at the Cape Coast Castle, one of nearly 40 slave castles built in the Gold Coast, now Ghana, more than 70 families discovered their family tree during the African Ancestry DNA disclosure which is possibly the largest ever in the continent.

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Source: Yen

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