Richard Koo: Economist says China will find coronavirus more challenging than SARS

Richard Koo: Economist says China will find coronavirus more challenging than SARS

- An economist with Nomura Holdings Inc has indicated that China may have a greater challenge dealing with coronavirus than SARS

- SARS appeared in 2003 and was characterized by fever, dry cough, headache, muscle aches and difficulty in breathing

- It was however contained a few months after it spread across the globe

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Nomura Holdings Inc. has predicted that China may have more trouble dealing with the coronavirus compared with how it dealt with Severe Acute Respiratory Syndrome (SARS) in 2003.

SARS was a virus that appeared in China in 2003 and spread all over the world in a few months but was quickly contained.

It was transmitted through droplets that spread through the air whenever a victim coughs, sneezes or talks.

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SARS was characterized by fever, dry cough, headache, muscle aches and difficulty in breathing.

There has been no known transmission in 2004 and Richard Koo, an economist with Nomura, believes China may be facing unprecedented changes.

Per a report by Business Insider, Koo believes parts of the Chinese economy that supported recovery after the SARS epidemic, such as a growing labor force and corporate investment, may be lacking today.

His position comes in the face of expectations from Wall Street to the effect that China’s economy will bounce back from the coronavirus with few long-term consequences, just as it did with SARS in 2003.

In other news, a team of scientists has successfully invented a device that generates electricity from the air with the help of microbes.

The device, described as an air-powered generator, or Air-Gen, functions when water in the air reacts with tiny conductive filaments.

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These filaments are produced by a microbe which creates an electric charge, vice.com reports.

YEN.com.gh understands that the technology is still in its primary stages but there are hopes it could be used as a source of sustainable energy for electronic devices.

According to the researchers, who are all from the University of Massachusetts Amherst, it is simply a case of making electricity out of thin air.

They added that the Air-Gen creates clean energy and it results from the application of protein nanowires.

The nanowires, they explained, are tiny strings of proteins, around a billionth of a meter, which carry electrical charges.

The Air-Gen, which has successfully been used to light small LED bulbs, produces a sustained voltage of about 0.5 volts for about 20 hours before self-recharging.

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