Coronavirus: Scientists from UK, US say their vaccines show promising signs

Coronavirus: Scientists from UK, US say their vaccines show promising signs

- Hopes are rising for a working vaccine as the world continues to battle with the deadly COVID-19

- Two projects in the UK and the US have reported promising results in their early experiments

- Experimental jabs are being developed by these teams and they both say the results are promising

- Our Manifesto: This is what YEN.com.gh believes

As the world battles with the deadly COVID-19, hopes are rising for a working vaccine in the United Kingdom and the United States.

Two projects in the UK and the US have reported promising results in their early experiments, Daily Trust reports.

Teams from Oxford University and the American pharmaceutical company Moderna have been developing experiment jabs for months.

Legit.ng gathers that the teams are trying to protect millions of people from being infected with COVID-19 in the future.

Both teams have revealed that people in their studies are showing signs of immunity.

Oxford scientists said they are 80 per cent confident that they can have a jab available by September.

READ ALSO: Face masks: Africa’s economy could benefit from at least $1.5bn yearly

Coronavirus: Scientists from UK, US say their vaccines show promising signs

Two projects in the UK and the US have reported promising results in their early experiments. Photo credit: Daily Mail
Source: UGC

Researchers said antibodies and white blood cells called T cells are being developed by people that are given the Oxford vaccine.

The antibodies and white blood cells will help their bodies fight off the virus if they get infected.

According to experts at Moderna, based in Cambridge, Massachusetts, participants in their trial all successfully developed antibodies.

READ ALSO: A study in London has linked brain damage to mild Covid-19 infections

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Source: Yen

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