Meet Charlotta Bass, the first Black woman to run for vice-president in the United States (Photo)

Meet Charlotta Bass, the first Black woman to run for vice-president in the United States (Photo)

- Charlotte Bass was a renowned political activist and journalist in the 1940s

- The audacious African-American woman made history when she became the first Black woman to run for vice-president of the United States in 1952

- Bass run for vice-president on the ticket of the Progressive Party

Our Manifesto: This is what YEN.com.gh believes in

Install our latest app for Android and read the best news about Ghana!

At a time when segregation was rife, Charlotte Bass imprinted her name and accomplishments in the sands of history.

She became the first African-American woman to run for vice-president of the United States.

In 1952, Bass, a political activist and renowned journalist, made her mark. She began a career as a conservative Republican but her job changed by the 1940s.

READ ALSO: PHOTOS: Meet Bertil Toby, Ghanaian 3D character artist and game animator

Meet Charlotta Bass, the first Black woman to run for vice-president in the United States (Photo)

Meet Charlotta Bass is the first Black woman to run for vice-president in the United States. She run on the ticket of the Progressive Party in 1952. Photo credit: Blackhistory.com/UGC
Source: UGC

As a result, she became more forward and progressive though she left the Democratic party due to what she thought was the party’s inability to address the issues of Black women.

She aligned with the Progressive Party, supporting Henry Wallace in 1948 as the Progressive Party candidate.

After four years of advocating the issues of Black women and committing herself to the Progressive Party, she became a nominee herself.

Blackhistory.com reports that Bass described becoming the first African-American woman to run for vice-president as ''a great responsibility''.

READ ALSO: I started hustling at age 23 - Gender Minister shares powerful story to inspire entrepreneurs

Despite being defeated in the contest, only receiving 140,000 votes, Bass inked her name and her bold decision to run for president in the history books.

She has become a prominent figure and a great representation for younger Black women who aspire to reach beyond the skies, break barriers, and set their own standards.

In another story, Ramona Hood inked her name in the history books after she became the first African-American to be named president and CEO of FedEx Custom Critical.

The high-achieving woman etched her name in the sands of history in 2020, as the establishment’s first African-American and woman to hold the position since the company's inception.

Until her appointment, Commercial Appeal reports that Hood transitioned into her role as CEO after serving as vice president of operations, strategy, and planning for FedEx Custom Critical. However, her initial position at FedEx was a receptionist.

READ ALSO: Mart Samuel: Meet the Koforidua varsity graduate who works as a painter but still searching for a job

Carruthers Tetteh: Overcoming blindness to be a lawyer in Ghana:

Subscribe to watch new videos

Have national and human interest issues to discuss? Know someone who is extremely talented and needs recognition?

Your stories and photos are always welcome. Get interactive via our Facebook page.

Source: Yen

Online view pixel