Study reveals how going to church improves lifespan

Study reveals how going to church improves lifespan

According to a research by CNN, attending church regularly is likely to increase ones lifespan.

A research work by Nurses’Health Study opined that women who were seen in church more than once a week had a 33% lower risk of dying during the study period compared with those who said they never went.

Less-frequent attendance was also associated with a lower risk of death, as women who attended once a week or less than weekly had 26% and 13% lower risk of death, respectively.

The participants also opined that regularly attending religious services also had higher rates of social support and optimism, had lower rates of depression and were less likely to smoke.

Also even though the research indicated that going to church could have a number of additional benefits that could, in turn, improve longevity, but the researchers were not able to examine them with the available data.

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Most of the women in the study were protestant or catholic, so it is not clear whether a similar association would be found between religious service attendance and longevity for people of other Christian religions, Judaism or Islam.

The study also did not explore the association in men but previous research suggests that male churchgoers also benefit, though their decrease in death rate is not as large as among women, VanderWeele, professor of epidemiology in the Harvard T.H. Chan School of Public Health said.

The findings have been mixed about whether aspects of religious devotion such as prayer and spirituality -- such as reading the Bible or other religious literature -- improve longevity.

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