Ghana's voter maturity - a short essay on the Ghanaian voter

Ghana's voter maturity - a short essay on the Ghanaian voter

Every four years, Ghanaian citizens take to the ballot box to cast a vote, allowing each and every citizen the opportunity to choose a president who they believe is fit to lead the nation; and since 2000, Ghana has been one of very few African countries to be able to this peacefully.

Ghana's voter maturity - a short essay on the Ghanaian voter

It’s interesting that every Ghanaian election year also happens to be an election year in the United States, with the United States voting a good month before Ghana gets to do the same. To the extent where one wonders if this is no coincidence but rather by design, as though Ghana is inadvertently being shown how the democratic process is supposed to be done. This isn’t bad… at least, not when you consider that the USA is the oldest working democracy and this being said – especially with recent events – it really wouldn’t hurt to learn a few things about what it takes to create a vibrant, working democracy.

Ghana's voter maturity - a short essay on the Ghanaian voter

Up until the beginning of October, the political arena had been extremely ordinary, in other words, predictable. With Candidates doing what they do best, shaking hands, taking pictures, and making statements.

READ ALSO: Woyome denies Occupy Ghana allegations

This isn’t to say that it’s been a quiet or dull state of affairs, no, no, dear reader, far from it. This year has definitely been a very eventful political year. From mass presidential candidate disqualifications that sparked a flurry of lawsuits, which finally ended with a Supreme Court ruling. Not to mention all the drama that went in between, surely the entire country’s appetite for political scandal has been sated.

Ghana's voter maturity - a short essay on what Ghanaians will be voting for this year

The governing NDC’s message has been that of infrastructure development, while a majority of the opposition parties have responded by saying it’s not enough to keep people happy and prosperous. Add to that the all too many allegations of corruption throughout the last four years, and you have an opposition that’s pretty confident that they’ll have the last say.

Ghana's voter maturity - a short essay on the Ghanaian voter

The government’s response, howver, is that infrastructure is needed first, before the social interventionism can be entertained.

If you Googled social interventionism you’d get this definition:

Social interventionism is an action which involves the intervention of a government or an organization in social affairs.

A good local examples of such initiatives are the National Health Insurance Scheme (NHIS), The Education service, which many have accused the current government of severely mismanaging.

Now with 7 days to go before the country goes to the ballot boxes, one can’t help but wonder what the Ghanaian will be voting for? Is the average Ghanaian still the person that votes for the road that was built or repaved, or is he/she now voting for social intervention initiatives. Because the answer to that is bound to tip the scales one way or the other in the coming elections.

READ ALSO: Lydia Forson's new blog post - "Lessons from America’s Presidential Race | Why the main OPPOSITION (NPP) may lose in the upcoming Elections"

Ghana's voter maturity - a short essay on the Ghanaian voter

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