Waste into wealth! Women turn boxes, bottles, cans into hats, bags and even books for kids (photos, video)

Waste into wealth! Women turn boxes, bottles, cans into hats, bags and even books for kids (photos, video)

- A group of women have ventured into waste management business in efforts to sustain their families and keep environment clean

-These women have formed clubs where they collect waste and recycle them into different products for sell

- Some of their products include hats, mats, caps, sanitary wear, artefacts for decoration, washing baskets and learning materials for kids

Most people treat waste with at most disdain. But there is this group of women from Plumtree, Canada, that have developed huge respect for all sorts of rubbish.

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Waste into WEALTH! Women turn boxes, bottles, cans into hats, bags and even books for kids (photo)

Mrs Miriam Moyo, one of the group members, selling her recycled waste products.

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These Plumtree women have ventured into waste management projects in order to sustain their families while at the same time keeping the environment clean.

They have formed a club called Simidzilani Health Club through which they collect waste and recycle them into different products, which are then sold to area residents, motorists and schools.

"As a club, we collect cardboard boxes, pieces of cloth, empty drink cans, plastic bottles and clothing items from the rubbish dump," says Miriam Moyo, one of the Simidzilani Health Club club members.

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Waste into WEALTH! Women turn boxes, bottles, cans into hats, bags and even books for kids (photo)

Many people treat it as rubbish. Mrs Moyo and her club members see it as source of livelihood.

They recycle the rubbish to produce products such as hats, caps, bags, washing baskets, mats, sanitary wears, artefacts for decoration and learning materials for Early Childhood Development learners.

"We sell these products to residents in the area, motorists and schools. The prices range from 0.50 cents to US$ 10 depending on what the customer is buying," says Mrs Moyo.

The revenue generated from the business, she adds, helps her to buy food supplies and groceries for her family on daily basis.

Mrs Moyo was encouraged to join the waste management club during a campaign that was being run under the water and sanitation hygiene (Wash) programme.

"While many look at rubbish and disregard it and rush to dispose of it, I see it as a source of livelihood. I may not be able to fetch a lot of cash by selling products from the recycled waste, but at least I am able to put food on the table for my family," says Mrs Moyo.

They were educated on the importance of hygiene and how to make products out of waste under the Wash programme.

They were also trained on how to make a few of the products. However, as a club, Mrs Moyo says they used their creativity to broadened the scope of products that they could produce from wastes.

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Watch video of an Indian woman who collects waste for a living:

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