Police warns public of fake car-dealing syndicates

Police warns public of fake car-dealing syndicates

- Ghanaians have been warned against fraudulent vehicle-selling syndicate

- According to the police, the syndicates are particularly operating in Accra, Kumasi, obese, Tarkwa and Sekondi-Takoradi

The Ghana Police Service has cautioned the public to be wary of fake car dealers operating around the country with a motive to dupe hapless citizens.

According to the Police, fake car-trading syndicates now abound in the country, and citizens must be on the look out, so as not to get defrauded.

Police warns public of fake car-dealing syndicates

The public is advised to be cautious in dealing with persons other than known dealerships who offer vehicles for sale at cheap prices

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A statement signed by the Deputy Director of Public Relations, DSP Sheilla Kessie Abayie-Buckman, said: “The public is advised to be cautious in dealing with persons other than known dealerships who offer vehicles for sale at cheap prices, and persons who show interest in the vehicles which they advertise for sale.”

The police say these fake car-trading syndicates usually engage their victims through online marketing sites, before using tricky means to dupe them.

The public, therefore, has been advised to be wary of these fake car-dealing syndicates. The police are also urging the public to report any persons they suspect of engaging in these fraudulent deals.

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Below is the full statement released by the Police:

BEWARE – FAKE VEHICLE DEALING SYNDICATES AT WORK

The Police Administration wishes to bring to the notice of the general public some syndicates involved in vehicle sale fraud across the country particularly in Accra, Tema, Kumasi, Obuasi, Tarkwa and Sekondi-Takoradi.

The modus operandi of these syndicates is to advertise vehicles for sale with their phone numbers both on vehicles and at online marketing sites, mostly on tonaton.com and car mudi and cheki.com, luring unsuspecting persons to contact them.

Typically, when a potential buyer calls the advertised number to express interest, the supposed seller arranges to meet the buyer at a place where the vehicle is parked, usually at a workshop, fuel station or by the road side. The potential buyer is given opportunity to examine and test drive the vehicle. When negotiations are concluded the seller opts to introduce the buyer to another member of the syndicate, sometimes tagged as the owner of the vehicle.

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This self-styled owner usually meets the buyer and seller at a busy public place. At this meeting, the said owner shows and hands over documents covering the vehicle together with the ignition key to the buyer in exchange of the purchase money. Thereafter, under the pretext of accompanying the buyer to hand over the vehicle to him or her, members of the syndicate manage to escape with both the money and the vehicle, leaving the buyer stranded with fake car documents and ignition key.

In some instances, members of the syndicate rather approach people who have advertised their cars for sale and pretend to be interested, only to bolt with the car in the process of test drive.

The public is advised to be cautious in dealing with person so ther than known dealerships who offer vehicles for sale at cheap prices, and persons who show interest in their vehicles which they advertise for sale. The signs to look out for include quoted prices far below the market price of the said vehicle.

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Report any suspicious act involving the sale and purchase of vehicles to the nearest police station, police social media platforms or call 18555.

SGND

DEPUTY DIRECTOR/PUBLIC AFFAIRS

[SHEILLA KESSIE ABAYIE-BUCKMAN]

DEPUTY SUPERINTENDENT OF POLICE

THE MEDIA

Source: Yen

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