Famous Buildings Around The World Like Great Wall of China And Others Built With Mud

Famous Buildings Around The World Like Great Wall of China And Others Built With Mud

  • There are many famous buildings worldwide like the Great Wall of China and others that are made out of mud or rammed earth
  • Structures built with mud have existed for centuries, and rammed earth has proven to be one of the most durable building materials
  • Nevertheless, a lot of people are sceptical about building with mud and rather prefer to build houses with concrete and cement

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The world is replete with buildings made out of compacted mud. Some have existed for centuries yet still remain in good shape. YEN.com.gh mentions these interesting buildings below in this article.

Granada Alhambra in Spain

Granada Alhambra in Spain
Granada Alhambra in Spain. Photo credit: The Tour Guy. Source: UGC
Source: UGC

The Granada Alhambra fortress in Spain is made out of mud. It was included in the World Heritage list in 1984 for its extraordinary representation of Moorish and Andalusian culture, global beauty, and capacity to communicate the history of the region's changes over time via its architectural design and decorative schemes.

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The Arabic name Alhambra, which translates as "the red," is likely a result of the reddish colour of the rammed earth used to construct the outside walls. The Alhambra was built between 1238 and 1358.

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Some Parts of the Great Wall of China

Parts of the great wall were built with rammed earth
Parts of the great wall were built with rammed earth. Photo credit: Adolfo Preciado. Source: UGC
Source: UGC

The First Emperor of China oversaw the integration of China's old walls into a single wall sometime about 220 BCE, which is now known as the Great Wall of China. The wall was constructed primarily of wood and rammed earth during that period.

Emperor after emperor built on and fortified the wall, frequently in an effort to stave off northern invaders. The wall was eventually made of brick in certain areas. Also, granite and even marble blocks from quarries were used in fortifying the wall in other areas. As construction methods improved, the wall was continually updated.

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Tulou Circular Villages of the Hakka People

Tulou Circular Villages of the Hakka People
Tulou Circular Villages of the Hakka people. Photo credit: Beijing Hikers. Source: UGC
Source: UGC

"Fujian Tulou," means "earth building", and they are rural homes in China's Fujian area. There are several instances of this traditional architecture in this hilly region in the southeast of the nation. From the 12th through the 20th centuries, the Hakka people constructed such communal structures.

Their buildings may be recognized by their size, shape, construction style, and, most importantly, their distinctive functions. They were constructed both as a protective measure and to create a sense of togetherness.

Morocco's Aït Benhaddou City

Morocco's Aït Benhaddou City
Morocco's Aït Benhaddou City. Photo credit: Morocco Private Tours, Flawless Travel. Source: UGC
Source: UGC

Aït Benhaddou in Morocco is one of the most well-known mud cities in the world. It is a UNESCO World Heritage Site, and since it is so picturesque, it has been used as the backdrop for several films, including Gladiator (2000), The Last Temptation of Christ (1988), and Lawrence of Arabia (1962).

Nkabom House: Houses Made Out of Mud and Pure Water Sachets to Provide Homes in Remote Villages in Ghana

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30 foreigners come together to build library in a Ghanaian village using mud and wood

In an earlier article, YEN.com.gh wrote about how houses were constructed with mud and pure water sachets to provide homes for people in remote villages in Ghana. A fourth-year architecture student named Anna Webster created the architectural idea known as the Nkabom house.

The plan was created in response to a request for designs for a single-family home in a distant Ashanti village.

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Source: YEN.com.gh

Authors:
Richmond Setrana avatar

Richmond Setrana Richmond Setrana is a real estate editor for YEN.com.gh with 5 years of writing experience. He graduated from KNUST in 2016 with a bachelor’s degree in Sociology and is currently enrolled in a MA—Mass Communications program with Liverpool John Moores University. He has written for reputable platforms like meqasa.com, Noanyi, Edanra and Yourcommonwealth.org. He can be reached via: richmond.setrana@yen.com.gh

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