1830: Ghanaian King Badu Bonso II's life Taken by Dutch for Opposing their Movement

1830: Ghanaian King Badu Bonso II's life Taken by Dutch for Opposing their Movement

  • Badu Bonso II, a respected Ghanaian king of the 19th century, opposed the Dutch and was assassinated by them as a result
  • His head was later sent to the Netherlands and preserved in a jar of formaldehyde until it was discovered whilst dust was being gathered in a laboratory
  • After hearing of the head’s location in 2008, Ghana filed a request for its return and subsequently received it in 2009

A Ghanaian king named Badu Bonso II ruled over the people of Ahanta in the Western Region, who lived to the north and east of the Nzema.

The Ahanta land has been historically known as one of the richest areas on the coast of what is now Ghana.

How Ghanaian King's head was Taken Away by Dutch

It is reported that in 1830, Badu Bonsu II began to have problems with the Dutch, who were exploiting Ahanta based on the Butre Treaty, which was signed on August 27, 1656.

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1830: Ghanaian King Badu Bonso II's life Taken by Dutch for Opposing their Movement
King Badu Bonso II Credit: Ghanaianmuseum
Source: UGC

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The Ghanaian king, therefore, put up a challenge against the Butre Treaty's provisions and references, which resulted in a few battles between him and the Dutch officials in Gold Coast.

According to libertywritersafrica.com, the Ghanaian king's head was removed and taken to the Netherlands, where it remained for more than 170 years until Arthur Japin discovered it in 1997.

Interestingly, outside newspapers reported that the king was handed over by his own ''nation'' to Dutch colonists, who were then in control of a part of the former Gold Coast (present-day Ghana).

What became of Badu Bonso II's head

As YEN.com.gh previously reported, preserved in a jar of formaldehyde, the head of King Badu Bonsu II was discovered whilst gathering dust in a laboratory at the Leiden University Medical Centre.

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It had been there since its arrival in the late 1830s from what was then called the Dutch Gold Coast and is today Ghana.

After hearing of the head’s location in 2008, Ghana filed a request for its return, saying, ''without burial of the head, the deceased will be haunted in the afterlife.''

In March 2009, Ghana government officials announced that it would be returned to its homeland for proper burial.

Ghana claimed the head of Badu Bonsu II on July 23, 2009.

Source: Yen

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